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1935 Curtiss Condor, from static model plans, 200%, converted to electric RC ...

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    #31
    Not good today, again, but I got some stuff done, just the same...
    Here's the undercarriage block glued in place, with a ply plate, held on with nylon bolts, clamping the legs....





    In the event of a major landing incident, I'd rather the nylon bolts sheared off, which may protect the rest of the fuselage. It's not much (and I'm hoping to get her down safely, if ever she flies, of course...); in any case, I think it's enough to keep the gear in place whilst taxiing and landing. That's the hope, at any rate.
    A servo session follows, working out how best to connect 'em to the control surfaces. I try a few things, but settle for 'dominoes' on the servo arms, and adjustable clevises at t'other end. Once the fuselage is covered, it'll be quite difficult (read 'impossible'..?) to access the servo arms, but as I've gone for carbon rod instead of piano wire, I can't do a 'Z'-bend there. I'm not fond of 'Z'-bends, anyway. Here's the 'kit of parts'...



    ... awaiting installation. The runs will cross, to get as straight a line as I can to the control horns. I'm not decided yet whether to make these, or use a pair of nylon ones I have on hand. I'll have a go tomorrow to see what I can drum up; the jigsaw may help to cut a shape from ply. More then, then...

    Comment


      #32
      Here's today's progress...
      I've got the dope pot out in order to apply tissue to the empennage, starting with the tailplane and elevator. The pictures I have show a rather dramatic Swiss airline livery of Royal Blue and Orange, so I'll be using my approximation of that. To this end, I'll use orange tissue, and will spray acrylic paint over that. The tissue will heighten the depth of colour. Here's the doped pieces, awaiting a second coat...



      The photo shows a much more lurid orange than reality (it's a bit tern, even, with milky streaks from the doping, which will disappear with the second coat. However, the paint I've got for this is, in fact, fluorescent orange, so it will, in daylight, really resemble this photo..! T'will be visible in the sky, I reckon..!
      Meanwhile, I turn to the upper wing. Here's the provision for the strut tabs, with an 'exploded view' to the left, and the first rib doubler being glued in place...



      The clamps are placed where the square spacers are glued in, leaving a slot for the tab, which will be glued in later, after covering and painting.
      As for the covering, this is my roll of laminating film, from which I'm measuring out and cutting a seven-inch piece for a panel...



      I have stuff delivered from places such as Hobbyking; they use different box sizes, depending on the order. These come in very handy for working on when the dihedral prevents laying the wing down flat ...



      This is the filmed wing...





      Yes, I know that it doesn't show; it's transparent, you fool..! Eerily so, in fact; I have to be careful how I handle it to not poke my fingers through it (although it's pretty darned tough...). One mistake, when I left the heat-gun a little too long (or too close...) on one spot, and melted a hole, but it was easily patched in similar fashion to a bicycle puncture. I'll start doping the tissue on, maybe this evening, maybe tomorrow; we'll see.
      That's all for now, then. I've much left to do on the fuselage (mounting the engine nacelles, finishing the nose, placing the ESC's, fixing the control rods...), and it's possible I'll not get this finished for the end of month, but I'll try, without rushing things. Our daughter and the Littl'un will be over for their Christmas on the 21st, so I'm aiming to have it ready for then, as I'll be busy afterwards. Suspense, eh..?

      Comment


        #33
        This is the start of the covering of the upper wing, starting with the underside of the centre panel ...



        ... and finishing with the covering complete...



        Again, the colour is not as perky as that under workshop lights, but that's about to change..! Here's my make-shift spray booth, and the first coat of Fluorescent Orange now drying on the tailplane. For comparison, the elevator to the right is yet to be sprayed...



        It doesn't show up well in my photos, but the fluo adds quite some 'peps' to the piece. Once the two wings are done, the 'plane should be visible, at least..!
        Whilst this is drying, I get on with the motor mounts...



        Again, it's difficult to get decent pictures (well, not for studio photographers, but for dummies such as I ...), but the rods sticking upwards are, in fact, bamboo skewers being glued into the motor mount disks. These are perched on transparent bottle tops, simply as support. Once set, these skewers will be threaded through the wings, between the spars, such that the disks protrude forwards from the LE. I'll then build the rear of the nacelles back from the disks to the trailing edge, probably in 'turtle deck' fashion.
        I'm preparing cowlings to slip over the motor mounts (made from the lower part of the bottle tops in the photo above...). By a rare coincidence, the bottles have mouldings at their bottom, nine in all. I believe that the Condor had nine-cylinder radial engines, at least in some versions, so I've started to paint these cylinders on the inside of the nacelles. The cowlings are white at the front, then blue, like the fuselage. Here's the nacelles so far...



        ... I'll do the blue once the motor mounts are in place, so as to not have the paint too scratched up by trying them for fit.
        Enough for today; more tomorrow...

        Comment


          #34
          It's hotting up (well it's still quite chilly, really; maybe 'Things are snowballing' would be more appropriate..?). Here's today's events, then, in order of appearance...
          I wanted a steerable tail wheel, but couldn't attach it to the rudder, as I had to modify its geometry to fit with the elevators. I found, instead, a moderately-priced servo-driven assembly, so took the risk of getting one. Its tail wheel and axis, although looking to be very stout, are too far from proportion to be useful to me, however, I already had a suitable tail wheel, which lends itself quite well enough to adaption. This is the unit being fitted to a balsa platform...



          ... which is then in turn glued into the rear of the fuselage...



          I may have to extend the wiring a little, or maybe use a 'Y'-cable to couple with the rudder servo. I ran a simulation of the two together, using my little servo tester, to be sure that turning left rudder corresponds to turning left taxiing. Just as well, as the installation of the rudder servo had to be reversed; I don't know if it's easy (or indeed, possible...) to reverse a servo's movement, which would have been ideal, but it's looking good for now.
          While that's clamped up, I can get a bit more done on the nose section (or, as I like to think of it, the 'snout'...). I followed advice and re-thought my notching, making a simpler version by using double-sided tape to attach two hacksaw blades together. I added a third blade at one end, and cut the notches in the upper and lower formers with little difficulty. I'll make the tool again though, I think, as the teeth have to be perfectly level to get a good clean cut. Never mind, it worked well. Once cut, the stringers were glued in place, and held to the curve required by a series of elastic bands...





          The pins are there to hold a shim in place on one middle former, to match the curve required. Bad cutting on my part or a faulty trace of the plan..? Dunno, but the shim will be fine.
          Again, this has to dry, so I take on another task; that of spraying the upper wing with the same orange fluo acrylic as the tailplane. Another spray booth is improvised, using a cardboard box, fortuitously delivered yesterday morning. This is a photo of the wing before painting...



          ... and after ...



          Again, the photos don't really show the true effect, but you can at least see that there is a difference..!

          During this time, the tail wheel assembly is ready, so I can embark on another major enterprise: the fitting of the motors to the wings. This will be done in stages, with some degree of improvisation as we go along, as I don't have a definitive 'road map' of how to do this. I do realise, however, that I'll need a lot of flexibility in the placing of the ESC's, as the C of G will not be easily adjusted solely by moving the Lipo. I had wanted to build the ESC's into the wings, inside the innermost panel, but that's not going to be feasible.
          Wherever the ESC's end up, I need to extend the motor wires; by a nice coincidence I'm able to cannibalise an old server chassis for its cabling, which happen to correspond to the motor wires colour coding. Deliberately overly long, these are soldered to the existing cabling and heat-shrunk, then carefully threaded though the wing ribs, profiting from the holes through which the stack of ribs was bolted when they were created...





          As can be seen, the motor mount skewers thread through the wing spars; they will be bound and glued with strong twine and Gorilla Glue, once I've got the line of thrust sorted out. I'll do that using the tried and tested method of That Looks About Right (TLAR...), fixing the alignements by means of the rear nacelle shaping. I'm still pondering the exact method for that, but it's getting closer.
          Having got this far, the usual urge to see how the whole thing is going is too tempting to resist. Only loosely fitted out, of course, but the overall concept seems to be taking form...





          It's encouraging, and a very much-needed morale boost, to be able to recognise the craft and have confirmation that some of the choices made thus far are paying off. We're far from flight, of course, but, step by step...

          Comment


          • DLG1951
            DLG1951 commented
            Editing a comment
            As far as the rudder wheel servo issue goes, several things come to mind. If the servo is digital, perhaps it is programmable itself. Can you switch the rudder servo arm 18- degrees so that motion is reversed there, bringing the two in sync, as it were? There are electronic reversal devices, also.
            Last edited by DLG1951; 12-22-2018, 06:15 AM. Reason: additional comment

          • Dad3353
            Dad3353 commented
            Editing a comment
            @DLG1951...
            I adopted the simplest solution, by switching the servo arm 180°, as you mentioned. I had spaced the servos far enough apart to cater for just this eventuality (Don't ask how I knew to do that..! ). I've not heard of reversal stuff, but, these days, little surprises me..! I also had the option of changing for a 6-channel Rx and having a separate channel for the tail-wheel. The servo arm trick does the job just fine, though.
            Thanks for the comments.

          #35
          I really can't do much at all in this cold weather. The blue tissue was delivered, and this evening I managed to apply it to the fin and rudder, previously filmed, but I can't feel my fingers now. I've prepared a laminated block for carving the nose dome, but I'll not risk knives this evening, as I wouldn't know if I'm whittling wood or bone. When we get these cold snaps here in France, the electricity company applies a swingeing tarif for customers on a particular contract. It's our case; we have cheap rates all the year save these 'red' days. No problem for the main living quarters, as we have a wood-burner as our sole heating, but for the 'den', there's nothing adequate for working at all, still less be comfortable. Tomorrow I'll bring my carving into the kitchen area, but for today, that's all I've been able to do.
          The Good News is that the tissue went on with little fuss (it's not Esaki, so there's an element of risk when ordering...). Doing the fuselage will be 'interesting', but I'll cross that bridge when I come to it (after Easter at my current rate of progress...).
          More tomorrow, when I've thawed out a little...

          Comment


            #36
            I've papered the fin and rudder, and given it a second coat of thinned dope; here's the result ...



            It actually looks quite good 'in the flesh', with a slightly metallic, or pearlescent, finish. I may decide to keep it as it is, and not spray with acrylic (French Blue...); I'll see how the other blue parts turn out first, though.
            The next piece will probably be the detachable 'snout', which has progressed this evening from the relative comfort of my armchair, a metre or so away from the stove. (I had to drive into town at the unearthly time of 07h40, to have blood samples taken. The windscreen was completely opaque, there's been a quite hard frost these past few days. Keeping close to the stove is not a luxury..! )
            The snout needs a nose dome on which I can attach the stringers; from the basic block I'd made up I've carved, whittled and sanded a suitable piece. How to keep it in place for gluing up..? A very rudimentary jig is jury-rigged from a toilet roll, a few dress-making pins and a scrap of balsa. Not pretty, and delicate just the same (Have I said before that I'm clumsy..? ), but sufficient, I hope ...



            Some elastic bands helped, too, and the stringers were firstly softened with a cotton swab and hot water (handy, being close to the stove, no..?), then glued and pinned in batches. The result seems not too bad, considering; here it is, rough, still, and in need of some tidying up, but solid enough...



            I managed to break only one stringer in this exercise, which was a pleasant surprise.
            No, of course I couldn't resist popping it onto the fuselage, to see what it looks like, and here it is...



            Betterer an betterer, no..?
            I doubt I'll get much done tomorrow, the evening will be taken up by the club's AGM, followed by the 'end of year' soirée raclette. Amongst other items on the agenda is the 'official' launch of the new FFAM training-inscription system for becoming licensed to fly model aircraft, in similar fashion to the US stuff about 'drone laws' and such. It's without cost, apparently, with a video to watch, followed by a series of twenty questions or so on its contents, all on line. One then has to inscribe each of one's 'planes (over 800g, I believe...), and fix the model's ID to the 'plane somewhere. I'll have a go at that a bit later on, maybe early next year, but it doesn't seem to be too draconien. I've not yet successfully flown a 'plane yet, either..!

            Comment


              #37
              Not well again, today, so very little progress.. I did, however, force myself to do a test spray, so as to decide whether to paint the blue tissue, or leave it 'nature'. I have a test build, part of a very-much-battered Dani glider that I don't even remember having constructed, several decades ago. I had previously 'cannibalised' part of a (broken...) wing for testing; here it is in its original 'test-bed' state...



              I stripped off the green tissue, rather easily, taking it back to its 'Doculam' state (photo from archives...)...



              I covered it with my freshly-delivered blue paper, and prepared to paint it. Here's my fold-up spray booth (patent pending...), with the test piece all set...



              ... and the piece comfortably installed on its spray pedestal (patent pending...)...



              A family photo, then, of before ...



              ... and after ...



              Of course, it's difficult to appreciate under such primitive lighting conditions; I'll see about a photo in natural daylight tomorrow, perhaps, but I think I prefer the sprayed version, as being more opaque, and having the streaking masked, giving a more regular sheen. I'll decide in the morning, when it's light.
              Last night I added a couple of sticks to the cockpit area, but nothing worth photographing, and I wasn't on top form then, either, so didn't insist too much.
              The weather is maintaining a modest weak sunshine for the moment, which helps morale (slightly...). Here's hoping I can get a bit more done tomorrow. We'll see.

              Comment


                #38
                Again, little progress, but here's what I have done...



                Too delicate for me to attempt 'scale' glazing, so these 'blind' cockpit windows will have to do. Odd angles, and little structure on which to attach stuff; elastic bands come in handy whilst the Titebond does its magic. One of the penalties for not using superglue that is to be endued. Never had much luck with the stuff anyway.
                A bit later on, and the upper stringers, above the cockpit, have to bend to my will. My powers of telekinetic persuasion failing, I resort, once again, to the use of the mighty elastic band, helped with liberal applications of water, dabbed on the sticks with a cotton bud ...



                Apologies for the rotten photos; my eyes are not so good of late, and my camera isn't ideal for close-up, macro stuff.
                I turn to another detail; the gluing in of the control rod guide tubes. Again, lousy pics, but the globs of Gorilla Glue can just about be seen (I hope..!) where the guides transpierce the bulkhead...



                I've sheeted and papered these tail flanks now, as I'll be wanting to glue the tailplane and fin in place, and it'll be difficult do to it after that...



                That's all for today; hoping, once again, to be able to get more done tomorrow. I'll do another test weighing, to decide where to attach the ESC's, and possibly get the underbelly stringers fitted. We'll see...

                Comment


                  #39
                  Somewhat inspired this evening, as decisions have been taken. Firstly, I weighed the whole gubbins again, and got 830 gr, with some wiring still to do, and the fuselage/lower wing yet to cover. I think I'll be safe in anticipating an all-up final weight of less than 1 Kg, which is encouraging.
                  Secondly, and more importantly, I mounted the whole 'plane again, with u/c, empennage, upper wing perched etc in order to establish once and for all the best place for the ESC's, and thus the Lipo position, for balancing around C of G. It turns out that there's a nice spot below decks, in the lower wing centre section, that enables the ESC's to snuggle down nicely, with shortish cable runs and air enough to 'breath'. This, in turn, gives a battery position with maximum leeway for adjustment, and good access for plugging in. I was able to obtain the invaluable assistance of Our Eldest and strike whilst the (soldering...) iron was hot, and wire up the ESC's, the battery and the Rx, and even connect it all up with the Tx to give the motors a test run..! ...



                  Just lashed up for the occasion, of course, and without the props (..!), but the sense of rotation was correct on each side, and I even remembered to disconnect one ESC Rx power lead, so it all worked first time..! Here's the underside; the ESC's can be seen, with their mess of cables tucked away...



                  Result..! We checked again the rudder and elevator servos, so they're now good for connecting to the empennage when I glue it in, which won't be long now.
                  Very pleased, then, with this evening's progress. I've started building the nacelles, and will be able to add the fuselage upper stringers, and start to think about filming the whole thing. Progress indeed, then.
                  Tired now, of course. Tomorrow evening I drive to the train station to pick up Our Daughter and the Littl'un for our Christmas dinner together Saturday evening. That will be a welcome diversion; a change is as good as a rest, they say. Hmm... I'll put that to the test...

                  Comment


                    #40
                    Various details, in the order in which they've been executed...
                    The whole 'plane is very delicate to handle in her current state, and so some cushioning has been enrolled to keep her steady on the bench without stress. I've a pair of suspension struts to fix to the undercarriage. No real functionality, but a (slightly...) more scale appearance, so...



                    A close-up of the clumsy bolting arrangement, hopefully hidden when I get round to building the underside of the nacelles, and a wider view ...





                    These are parts made for RC trucks and the like; I just thought they'd help the 'look' of the 'plane.
                    It can be difficult holding laminating film in place, so I've taken on a whole series of little helpers, to keep the draped film from sliding off at the slightest movement...



                    Here's the 'snout', then, fully filmed...



                    No, no; I've said it before..! Of course you can't see the film; it's transparent..! (Oh, some people..! ...)
                    Now for the battery tray, or rather, platform. Although there's plenty of space in there, it's not at all easy of access. The Lipo has to be fed in from the front, and will have a critical role to play in establishing the correct C or G (wherever that turns out to be...).I need, then to allow plenty of scope for adjustments, both before flight and after test flights. Too far back will interfere with the servos, so a platform is made up, to raise the battery above the servo arms. Here it is being glued up (in the foreground...); one may see a pair of formers being glued in, too, behind the motors, to which stringers will be fixed to form the nacelle 'turtle-decks...



                    Here's the platform in place, with a piece of Velcro to hold the battery, in its strap...



                    I'm going to try to sheet the nacelle turtle-decks, and am preparing two pairs of curved sheet for that. By an amazing coincidence, I have more apple-juice bottles over which I've bent these pieces (not really a surprise, the bottles were in a pack of six..! ).
                    Another of my 'Top Tips': always have on hand a large supply of elastic bands, of several sizes, preferably colour-coded...



                    I've wetted to outer face of the sheets, and will see tomorrow when it's dried out, if the form has been maintained, and whether it can fit the nacelle stringers...



                    Patience, then.
                    Meanwhile, there's still more to do. Now that the snout has been filmed, I can try applying the blue tissue. I'll have another go at the 'George' method, 'drawing' the paper across a tray of water and laying it in place gently. This not Esaki, and so I'll have to be very careful not to tear it, as its wet strength is not perfect. Here's the first piece...



                    I'll leave it till tomorrow to dry, then trim it and apply the thinned dope. Fingers crossed; this is one of the easier pieces to cover, so ...
                    More tomorrow; Merry Christmas, everyone...

                    Comment


                      #41
                      We had our Christmas on Saturday, so it's been pretty calm, today; I've been able to muddle on with more details. In several stages, the upper nacelle sheets have been glued in place, not without the usual hunt for innovation: how to hold it all down till the glue sets..? Here's the first piece...



                      ... and the last pieces...





                      ... Each a mechanical challenge to see how to fit pins, elastic bands, clamps, weights and more such that the sheets follow the composite curves and stay in contact with the glued stringers; a real Chinese puzzle.
                      A general view; it'll set overnight ...



                      Whilst these parts are setting, there's time to add sheets of a different kind: tissue for the snout. Again, in several stages: the underside, each flank in turn, the top, then the nose. Here's the result so far...



                      A bit lumpy in places, where the woodwork is less than perfect, and with a fair few folds and creases where the paper wouldn't oblige by hugging the curves in ideal fashion. Still, I'm pleased with the result. Far below the quasi-perfection I see in models by others, but the best I can do, so will suffice. Not a concours winner, certainly, but it is what it is, and will be quite smart enough when at an altitude of twenty metres..!
                      Tomorrow, more filming, I think, if the nacelles are OK. I'll finish the lower wings, then the flanks, and, hopefully, the upper fuselage. I mustn't forget to add the fixing points for the central wing supports, at the top of the fuselage below where the upper wing will be joined. I'll see about that first thing; it'll be too late once the last filming is completed. More tomorrow, then...

                      Comment


                        #42
                        Hi Douglas

                        Nacelles are again the perfect objects for vacuum moulding. One shape to make and then pull off four mouldings for two engines, one each top and bottom as they have no purpose whatsoever except to look real.Otherwise, they are a sod to cover.

                        To return to formers: if you grip yours between forefinger and thumb at the 1 and 7 o'clock position or at the 11 and 5 0'clock position and squeeze, they will collapse. All those butt stick points are very weak and the banana-shaped bits are only there to provide shape and cover support. I take the outer outline and then draw an inner outline about 3/8 or 1/2 inch inside. Then I cut it out of 1/16 ply with my Proxxon scroll saw. Cutting the notches is also easier.

                        All for now

                        M

                        Comment


                          #43
                          Originally posted by mfslater View Post
                          Hi Douglas...
                          This Build Log was started on the 18th of August, this year. I would have appreciated your pertinent comments on the 19th of August..! A bit late for this one, but I do take on board all and every snippet of wisdom offered; it all helps when building the next one (which has, of course, its own lot of blunders and faux pas...). I take your point about the formers. I had originally tried to get a quote to have a remodelled version of these, re-drawn as one piece, square frames, cut by a laser cutter, but he was about to embark on a longish holiday, and couldn't respect the delay I needed. That's why I went the 'easy' route and built them as per plan. I hadn't, as yet, acquired the jigsaw, either, so cut out and notched 'em all by hand. A lot of the 'issues' I had stemmed from the fact that the original plan (can be seen in my very first post...) is, apparently, of a static, non-flying model, made for display only, and with half the span of my version. Had I realised the problems I was to encounter, I think, with the benefit of hindsight, that I could have chosen a more suitable subject for my more-than-modest abilities. Have I learnt my lesson..? We'll see when I choose my next victim, once the Condor is finished..!
                          Thanks again for participating; I learn a little every time, even at my age.

                          Comment


                            #44
                            First, an anecdote, if you will... I got up today, looked at the clock on the chimney, and saw 12:30. Not too unusual, but later than I thought. By reflex, I also glanced at the clock on the kitchen wall. Hmm... 4:30. It's stopped during the night. Never mind, I'll change the battery.
                            Gasp..! No, it's working, and telling the right time; it's the chimney clock that stopped just after midday..! I had really slept for twelve hours solid..! I must have been tired, I suppose..! So, a shorter day than anticipated, but rested, at least..!
                            Once the clocks sorted, and after my daily meds, time to get that fuselage detail sorted. Here's the support being glued in; it will hold the centre struts between the fuselage and the centre of the upper wing...



                            That done, I can crack on with filming the rest of the lower wings, the flanks and the upper fuselage. Our Eldest was very helpful in holding the 'plane for the flanks, as it's dodgy parking it on its side, and it needs twisting and turning to get the iron in the right spots. I can't really imagine what kind of apparatus would be able to do the job with such dexterity. Here's the result (and no, you still can't see the film, as it's transparent..! )...



                            We can see the nacelles, though, fresh from their painting and fitted over the motors. I'll try not to need to remove them now, as they're a tight fit, and, by some stroke of luck, have ended up in just about the perfect alignment. Yes, one can be lucky, sometimes.
                            With the the filming completed, I can carry on with the tissue covering, starting with the underside of the lower wings. I'm evolving a variant on the 'George' method, as this tissue is very delicate when wetted. The first piece was dragged over the tray of water, but 'flopped' quite a lot as I was draping it over the wing. I managed to lift it enough to be able to slowly offer it back down with one hand, whilst smoothing its path with the softest of camel-hair paint brushes. Patience, an unusually steady hand and yet more good fortune saw it finally laid flat, with very few, small, creases. I doubt I could repeat the exploit, so the other wing was laid on dry, and the same soft brush used to flow water over, progressively from one end to the other. It needed lifting a couple of times, but it was far less risky than the water drag. It's on, that's the main thing, and will dry out (and hopefully shrink...) overnight...



                            Not the most elegant of photos, I'll admit, but the 'plane is held with some stability, and it's easy to swivel the cushion around for all round access.
                            Tomorrow, doping, and the upper surfaces. With any luck, the tissue will all be on by late tomorrow. Depends, of course, on what time I rise, though..!

                            Comment


                              #45
                              I've been busy on her all afternoon, applying and doping the lower wings. As mentioned previously, my 'system' is an on-going evolution, and a new element was added when I read on t'web of another hint. I now use a glue-stick around the edges, lay the dry paper on, then spray very lightly with water. OK so far; I've done it before like this with modest results. Here's the hint, however (apologies for those already 'in the know'; to me this was a revelation...). To dry the tissue, instead of waiting for Nature to take its course, I use my heat-gun..! It's only small (not a paint stripper..!), but by gently wafting warm air over the tissue, I could actually see it un-wrinkling and tightening up..! The dope then follows; this, in turn, tends to loosen up the tissue, but comes up nicely once dried. In one or two tougher spots, when bubbles or wrinkles remained, an application of heat from my sealing iron over the doped tissue did the trick.
                              Here's the lower wing, fully covered and doped...



                              I'll switch to 'painting' mode after dinner, and airbrush the orange coat, before applying the fuselage tissue. That'll make masking a bit more of a simple operation.
                              Other than the improved (not perfect still, but improved...) finish that this quick-dry method brings, it has another huge benefit in present circumstances, as the 'through-time' is much shortened, allowing me to get on to the next step without having to wait a day or more for water to evaporate. Given the short time left before closing (and the present climate here...), it's a real boon. The better finish means I may even get to finish better..! Not promised, naturally, as there's a saying 'There's many a slip twixt cup and lip'..! More later...

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